source: noc/nagios/nagios.cfg @ 1077

Last change on this file since 1077 was 1075, checked in by quentin, 14 years ago
Add monitoring of stuff
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1##############################################################################
2#
3# NAGIOS.CFG - Sample Main Config File for Nagios
4#
5#
6##############################################################################
7
8
9# LOG FILE
10# This is the main log file where service and host events are logged
11# for historical purposes.  This should be the first option specified
12# in the config file!!!
13
14log_file=/var/log/nagios3/nagios.log
15
16# Debian also defaults to using the check commands defined by the debian
17# nagios-plugins package
18cfg_dir=/etc/nagios-plugins/config
19
20# OBJECT CONFIGURATION FILE(S)
21# These are the object configuration files in which you define hosts,
22# host groups, contacts, contact groups, services, etc.
23# You can split your object definitions across several config files
24# if you wish (as shown below), or keep them all in a single config file.
25
26# You can specify individual object config files as shown below:
27cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/checkcommands.cfg
28cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/misccommands.cfg
29cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/base.cfg
30cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/contacts.cfg
31cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/hostgroups.cfg
32cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/hosts.cfg
33cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/services.cfg
34
35cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/xvm.cfg
36cfg_file=/etc/nagios3/sipb.cfg
37
38
39# OBJECT CACHE FILE
40# This option determines where object definitions are cached when
41# Nagios starts/restarts.  The CGIs read object definitions from
42# this cache file (rather than looking at the object config files
43# directly) in order to prevent inconsistencies that can occur
44# when the config files are modified after Nagios starts.
45
46object_cache_file=/var/cache/nagios3/objects.cache
47
48
49
50# PRE-CACHED OBJECT FILE
51# This options determines the location of the precached object file.
52# If you run Nagios with the -p command line option, it will preprocess
53# your object configuration file(s) and write the cached config to this
54# file.  You can then start Nagios with the -u option to have it read
55# object definitions from this precached file, rather than the standard
56# object configuration files (see the cfg_file and cfg_dir options above).
57# Using a precached object file can speed up the time needed to (re)start
58# the Nagios process if you've got a large and/or complex configuration.
59# Read the documentation section on optimizing Nagios to find our more
60# about how this feature works.
61
62precached_object_file=/var/lib/nagios3/objects.precache
63
64
65
66# RESOURCE FILE
67# This is an optional resource file that contains $USERx$ macro
68# definitions. Multiple resource files can be specified by using
69# multiple resource_file definitions.  The CGIs will not attempt to
70# read the contents of resource files, so information that is
71# considered to be sensitive (usernames, passwords, etc) can be
72# defined as macros in this file and restrictive permissions (600)
73# can be placed on this file.
74
75resource_file=/etc/nagios3/private/resource.cfg
76
77
78
79# STATUS FILE
80# This is where the current status of all monitored services and
81# hosts is stored.  Its contents are read and processed by the CGIs.
82# The contents of the status file are deleted every time Nagios
83#  restarts.
84
85status_file=/var/cache/nagios3/status.dat
86
87
88
89# STATUS FILE UPDATE INTERVAL
90# This option determines the frequency (in seconds) that
91# Nagios will periodically dump program, host, and
92# service status data.
93
94status_update_interval=10
95
96
97
98# NAGIOS USER
99# This determines the effective user that Nagios should run as. 
100# You can either supply a username or a UID.
101
102nagios_user=nagios
103
104
105
106# NAGIOS GROUP
107# This determines the effective group that Nagios should run as. 
108# You can either supply a group name or a GID.
109
110nagios_group=nagios
111
112
113
114# EXTERNAL COMMAND OPTION
115# This option allows you to specify whether or not Nagios should check
116# for external commands (in the command file defined below).  By default
117# Nagios will *not* check for external commands, just to be on the
118# cautious side.  If you want to be able to use the CGI command interface
119# you will have to enable this.
120# Values: 0 = disable commands, 1 = enable commands
121
122check_external_commands=1
123
124
125
126# EXTERNAL COMMAND CHECK INTERVAL
127# This is the interval at which Nagios should check for external commands.
128# This value works of the interval_length you specify later.  If you leave
129# that at its default value of 60 (seconds), a value of 1 here will cause
130# Nagios to check for external commands every minute.  If you specify a
131# number followed by an "s" (i.e. 15s), this will be interpreted to mean
132# actual seconds rather than a multiple of the interval_length variable.
133# Note: In addition to reading the external command file at regularly
134# scheduled intervals, Nagios will also check for external commands after
135# event handlers are executed.
136# NOTE: Setting this value to -1 causes Nagios to check the external
137# command file as often as possible.
138
139#command_check_interval=15s
140command_check_interval=-1
141
142
143
144# EXTERNAL COMMAND FILE
145# This is the file that Nagios checks for external command requests.
146# It is also where the command CGI will write commands that are submitted
147# by users, so it must be writeable by the user that the web server
148# is running as (usually 'nobody').  Permissions should be set at the
149# directory level instead of on the file, as the file is deleted every
150# time its contents are processed.
151# Debian Users: In case you didn't read README.Debian yet, _NOW_ is the
152# time to do it.
153
154command_file=/var/lib/nagios3/rw/nagios.cmd
155
156
157
158# EXTERNAL COMMAND BUFFER SLOTS
159# This settings is used to tweak the number of items or "slots" that
160# the Nagios daemon should allocate to the buffer that holds incoming
161# external commands before they are processed.  As external commands
162# are processed by the daemon, they are removed from the buffer. 
163
164external_command_buffer_slots=4096
165
166
167
168# LOCK FILE
169# This is the lockfile that Nagios will use to store its PID number
170# in when it is running in daemon mode.
171
172lock_file=/var/run/nagios3/nagios3.pid
173
174
175
176# TEMP FILE
177# This is a temporary file that is used as scratch space when Nagios
178# updates the status log, cleans the comment file, etc.  This file
179# is created, used, and deleted throughout the time that Nagios is
180# running.
181
182temp_file=/var/cache/nagios3/nagios.tmp
183
184
185
186# TEMP PATH
187# This is path where Nagios can create temp files for service and
188# host check results, etc.
189
190temp_path=/tmp
191
192
193
194# EVENT BROKER OPTIONS
195# Controls what (if any) data gets sent to the event broker.
196# Values:  0      = Broker nothing
197#         -1      = Broker everything
198#         <other> = See documentation
199
200event_broker_options=-1
201
202
203
204# EVENT BROKER MODULE(S)
205# This directive is used to specify an event broker module that should
206# by loaded by Nagios at startup.  Use multiple directives if you want
207# to load more than one module.  Arguments that should be passed to
208# the module at startup are seperated from the module path by a space.
209#
210#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
211# WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING
212#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
213#
214# Do NOT overwrite modules while they are being used by Nagios or Nagios
215# will crash in a fiery display of SEGFAULT glory.  This is a bug/limitation
216# either in dlopen(), the kernel, and/or the filesystem.  And maybe Nagios...
217#
218# The correct/safe way of updating a module is by using one of these methods:
219#    1. Shutdown Nagios, replace the module file, restart Nagios
220#    2. Delete the original module file, move the new module file into place, restart Nagios
221#
222# Example:
223#
224#   broker_module=<modulepath> [moduleargs]
225
226#broker_module=/somewhere/module1.o
227#broker_module=/somewhere/module2.o arg1 arg2=3 debug=0
228
229
230
231# LOG ROTATION METHOD
232# This is the log rotation method that Nagios should use to rotate
233# the main log file. Values are as follows..
234#       n       = None - don't rotate the log
235#       h       = Hourly rotation (top of the hour)
236#       d       = Daily rotation (midnight every day)
237#       w       = Weekly rotation (midnight on Saturday evening)
238#       m       = Monthly rotation (midnight last day of month)
239
240log_rotation_method=d
241
242
243
244# LOG ARCHIVE PATH
245# This is the directory where archived (rotated) log files should be
246# placed (assuming you've chosen to do log rotation).
247
248log_archive_path=/var/log/nagios3/archives
249
250
251
252# LOGGING OPTIONS
253# If you want messages logged to the syslog facility, as well as the
254# Nagios log file set this option to 1.  If not, set it to 0.
255
256use_syslog=0
257
258
259
260# NOTIFICATION LOGGING OPTION
261# If you don't want notifications to be logged, set this value to 0.
262# If notifications should be logged, set the value to 1.
263
264log_notifications=1
265
266
267
268# SERVICE RETRY LOGGING OPTION
269# If you don't want service check retries to be logged, set this value
270# to 0.  If retries should be logged, set the value to 1.
271
272log_service_retries=1
273
274
275
276# HOST RETRY LOGGING OPTION
277# If you don't want host check retries to be logged, set this value to
278# 0.  If retries should be logged, set the value to 1.
279
280log_host_retries=1
281
282
283
284# EVENT HANDLER LOGGING OPTION
285# If you don't want host and service event handlers to be logged, set
286# this value to 0.  If event handlers should be logged, set the value
287# to 1.
288
289log_event_handlers=1
290
291
292
293# INITIAL STATES LOGGING OPTION
294# If you want Nagios to log all initial host and service states to
295# the main log file (the first time the service or host is checked)
296# you can enable this option by setting this value to 1.  If you
297# are not using an external application that does long term state
298# statistics reporting, you do not need to enable this option.  In
299# this case, set the value to 0.
300
301log_initial_states=0
302
303
304
305# EXTERNAL COMMANDS LOGGING OPTION
306# If you don't want Nagios to log external commands, set this value
307# to 0.  If external commands should be logged, set this value to 1.
308# Note: This option does not include logging of passive service
309# checks - see the option below for controlling whether or not
310# passive checks are logged.
311
312log_external_commands=1
313
314
315
316# PASSIVE CHECKS LOGGING OPTION
317# If you don't want Nagios to log passive host and service checks, set
318# this value to 0.  If passive checks should be logged, set
319# this value to 1.
320
321log_passive_checks=1
322
323
324
325# GLOBAL HOST AND SERVICE EVENT HANDLERS
326# These options allow you to specify a host and service event handler
327# command that is to be run for every host or service state change.
328# The global event handler is executed immediately prior to the event
329# handler that you have optionally specified in each host or
330# service definition. The command argument is the short name of a
331# command definition that you define in your host configuration file.
332# Read the HTML docs for more information.
333
334#global_host_event_handler=somecommand
335#global_service_event_handler=somecommand
336
337
338
339# SERVICE INTER-CHECK DELAY METHOD
340# This is the method that Nagios should use when initially
341# "spreading out" service checks when it starts monitoring.  The
342# default is to use smart delay calculation, which will try to
343# space all service checks out evenly to minimize CPU load.
344# Using the dumb setting will cause all checks to be scheduled
345# at the same time (with no delay between them)!  This is not a
346# good thing for production, but is useful when testing the
347# parallelization functionality.
348#       n       = None - don't use any delay between checks
349#       d       = Use a "dumb" delay of 1 second between checks
350#       s       = Use "smart" inter-check delay calculation
351#       x.xx    = Use an inter-check delay of x.xx seconds
352
353service_inter_check_delay_method=s
354
355
356
357# MAXIMUM SERVICE CHECK SPREAD
358# This variable determines the timeframe (in minutes) from the
359# program start time that an initial check of all services should
360# be completed.  Default is 30 minutes.
361
362max_service_check_spread=30
363
364
365
366# SERVICE CHECK INTERLEAVE FACTOR
367# This variable determines how service checks are interleaved.
368# Interleaving the service checks allows for a more even
369# distribution of service checks and reduced load on remote
370# hosts.  Setting this value to 1 is equivalent to how versions
371# of Nagios previous to 0.0.5 did service checks.  Set this
372# value to s (smart) for automatic calculation of the interleave
373# factor unless you have a specific reason to change it.
374#       s       = Use "smart" interleave factor calculation
375#       x       = Use an interleave factor of x, where x is a
376#                 number greater than or equal to 1.
377
378service_interleave_factor=s
379
380
381
382# HOST INTER-CHECK DELAY METHOD
383# This is the method that Nagios should use when initially
384# "spreading out" host checks when it starts monitoring.  The
385# default is to use smart delay calculation, which will try to
386# space all host checks out evenly to minimize CPU load.
387# Using the dumb setting will cause all checks to be scheduled
388# at the same time (with no delay between them)!
389#       n       = None - don't use any delay between checks
390#       d       = Use a "dumb" delay of 1 second between checks
391#       s       = Use "smart" inter-check delay calculation
392#       x.xx    = Use an inter-check delay of x.xx seconds
393
394host_inter_check_delay_method=s
395
396
397
398# MAXIMUM HOST CHECK SPREAD
399# This variable determines the timeframe (in minutes) from the
400# program start time that an initial check of all hosts should
401# be completed.  Default is 30 minutes.
402
403max_host_check_spread=30
404
405
406
407# MAXIMUM CONCURRENT SERVICE CHECKS
408# This option allows you to specify the maximum number of
409# service checks that can be run in parallel at any given time.
410# Specifying a value of 1 for this variable essentially prevents
411# any service checks from being parallelized.  A value of 0
412# will not restrict the number of concurrent checks that are
413# being executed.
414
415max_concurrent_checks=0
416
417
418
419# HOST AND SERVICE CHECK REAPER FREQUENCY
420# This is the frequency (in seconds!) that Nagios will process
421# the results of host and service checks.
422
423check_result_reaper_frequency=10
424
425
426
427
428# MAX CHECK RESULT REAPER TIME
429# This is the max amount of time (in seconds) that  a single
430# check result reaper event will be allowed to run before
431# returning control back to Nagios so it can perform other
432# duties.
433
434max_check_result_reaper_time=30
435
436
437
438
439# CHECK RESULT PATH
440# This is directory where Nagios stores the results of host and
441# service checks that have not yet been processed.
442#
443# Note: Make sure that only one instance of Nagios has access
444# to this directory! 
445
446check_result_path=/var/lib/nagios3/spool/checkresults
447
448
449
450
451# MAX CHECK RESULT FILE AGE
452# This option determines the maximum age (in seconds) which check
453# result files are considered to be valid.  Files older than this
454# threshold will be mercilessly deleted without further processing.
455
456max_check_result_file_age=3600
457
458
459
460
461# CACHED HOST CHECK HORIZON
462# This option determines the maximum amount of time (in seconds)
463# that the state of a previous host check is considered current.
464# Cached host states (from host checks that were performed more
465# recently that the timeframe specified by this value) can immensely
466# improve performance in regards to the host check logic.
467# Too high of a value for this option may result in inaccurate host
468# states being used by Nagios, while a lower value may result in a
469# performance hit for host checks.  Use a value of 0 to disable host
470# check caching.
471
472cached_host_check_horizon=15
473
474
475
476# CACHED SERVICE CHECK HORIZON
477# This option determines the maximum amount of time (in seconds)
478# that the state of a previous service check is considered current.
479# Cached service states (from service checks that were performed more
480# recently that the timeframe specified by this value) can immensely
481# improve performance in regards to predictive dependency checks.
482# Use a value of 0 to disable service check caching.
483
484cached_service_check_horizon=15
485
486
487
488# ENABLE PREDICTIVE HOST DEPENDENCY CHECKS
489# This option determines whether or not Nagios will attempt to execute
490# checks of hosts when it predicts that future dependency logic test
491# may be needed.  These predictive checks can help ensure that your
492# host dependency logic works well.
493# Values:
494#  0 = Disable predictive checks
495#  1 = Enable predictive checks (default)
496
497enable_predictive_host_dependency_checks=1
498
499
500
501# ENABLE PREDICTIVE SERVICE DEPENDENCY CHECKS
502# This option determines whether or not Nagios will attempt to execute
503# checks of service when it predicts that future dependency logic test
504# may be needed.  These predictive checks can help ensure that your
505# service dependency logic works well.
506# Values:
507#  0 = Disable predictive checks
508#  1 = Enable predictive checks (default)
509
510enable_predictive_service_dependency_checks=1
511
512
513
514# SOFT STATE DEPENDENCIES
515# This option determines whether or not Nagios will use soft state
516# information when checking host and service dependencies. Normally
517# Nagios will only use the latest hard host or service state when
518# checking dependencies. If you want it to use the latest state (regardless
519# of whether its a soft or hard state type), enable this option.
520# Values:
521#  0 = Don't use soft state dependencies (default)
522#  1 = Use soft state dependencies
523
524soft_state_dependencies=1
525
526
527
528# TIME CHANGE ADJUSTMENT THRESHOLDS
529# These options determine when Nagios will react to detected changes
530# in system time (either forward or backwards).
531
532#time_change_threshold=900
533
534
535
536# AUTO-RESCHEDULING OPTION
537# This option determines whether or not Nagios will attempt to
538# automatically reschedule active host and service checks to
539# "smooth" them out over time.  This can help balance the load on
540# the monitoring server. 
541# WARNING: THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL FEATURE - IT CAN DEGRADE
542# PERFORMANCE, RATHER THAN INCREASE IT, IF USED IMPROPERLY
543
544auto_reschedule_checks=0
545
546
547
548# AUTO-RESCHEDULING INTERVAL
549# This option determines how often (in seconds) Nagios will
550# attempt to automatically reschedule checks.  This option only
551# has an effect if the auto_reschedule_checks option is enabled.
552# Default is 30 seconds.
553# WARNING: THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL FEATURE - IT CAN DEGRADE
554# PERFORMANCE, RATHER THAN INCREASE IT, IF USED IMPROPERLY
555
556auto_rescheduling_interval=30
557
558
559
560# AUTO-RESCHEDULING WINDOW
561# This option determines the "window" of time (in seconds) that
562# Nagios will look at when automatically rescheduling checks.
563# Only host and service checks that occur in the next X seconds
564# (determined by this variable) will be rescheduled. This option
565# only has an effect if the auto_reschedule_checks option is
566# enabled.  Default is 180 seconds (3 minutes).
567# WARNING: THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL FEATURE - IT CAN DEGRADE
568# PERFORMANCE, RATHER THAN INCREASE IT, IF USED IMPROPERLY
569
570auto_rescheduling_window=180
571
572
573
574# SLEEP TIME
575# This is the number of seconds to sleep between checking for system
576# events and service checks that need to be run.
577
578sleep_time=0.25
579
580
581
582# TIMEOUT VALUES
583# These options control how much time Nagios will allow various
584# types of commands to execute before killing them off.  Options
585# are available for controlling maximum time allotted for
586# service checks, host checks, event handlers, notifications, the
587# ocsp command, and performance data commands.  All values are in
588# seconds.
589
590service_check_timeout=60
591host_check_timeout=30
592event_handler_timeout=30
593notification_timeout=30
594ocsp_timeout=5
595perfdata_timeout=5
596
597
598
599# RETAIN STATE INFORMATION
600# This setting determines whether or not Nagios will save state
601# information for services and hosts before it shuts down.  Upon
602# startup Nagios will reload all saved service and host state
603# information before starting to monitor.  This is useful for
604# maintaining long-term data on state statistics, etc, but will
605# slow Nagios down a bit when it (re)starts.  Since its only
606# a one-time penalty, I think its well worth the additional
607# startup delay.
608
609retain_state_information=1
610
611
612
613# STATE RETENTION FILE
614# This is the file that Nagios should use to store host and
615# service state information before it shuts down.  The state
616# information in this file is also read immediately prior to
617# starting to monitor the network when Nagios is restarted.
618# This file is used only if the preserve_state_information
619# variable is set to 1.
620
621state_retention_file=/var/lib/nagios3/retention.dat
622
623
624
625# RETENTION DATA UPDATE INTERVAL
626# This setting determines how often (in minutes) that Nagios
627# will automatically save retention data during normal operation.
628# If you set this value to 0, Nagios will not save retention
629# data at regular interval, but it will still save retention
630# data before shutting down or restarting.  If you have disabled
631# state retention, this option has no effect.
632
633retention_update_interval=60
634
635
636
637# USE RETAINED PROGRAM STATE
638# This setting determines whether or not Nagios will set
639# program status variables based on the values saved in the
640# retention file.  If you want to use retained program status
641# information, set this value to 1.  If not, set this value
642# to 0.
643
644use_retained_program_state=1
645
646
647
648# USE RETAINED SCHEDULING INFO
649# This setting determines whether or not Nagios will retain
650# the scheduling info (next check time) for hosts and services
651# based on the values saved in the retention file.  If you
652# If you want to use retained scheduling info, set this
653# value to 1.  If not, set this value to 0.
654
655use_retained_scheduling_info=1
656
657
658
659# RETAINED ATTRIBUTE MASKS (ADVANCED FEATURE)
660# The following variables are used to specify specific host and
661# service attributes that should *not* be retained by Nagios during
662# program restarts.
663#
664# The values of the masks are bitwise ANDs of values specified
665# by the "MODATTR_" definitions found in include/common.h. 
666# For example, if you do not want the current enabled/disabled state
667# of flap detection and event handlers for hosts to be retained, you
668# would use a value of 24 for the host attribute mask...
669# MODATTR_EVENT_HANDLER_ENABLED (8) + MODATTR_FLAP_DETECTION_ENABLED (16) = 24
670
671# This mask determines what host attributes are not retained
672retained_host_attribute_mask=0
673
674# This mask determines what service attributes are not retained
675retained_service_attribute_mask=0
676
677# These two masks determine what process attributes are not retained.
678# There are two masks, because some process attributes have host and service
679# options.  For example, you can disable active host checks, but leave active
680# service checks enabled.
681retained_process_host_attribute_mask=0
682retained_process_service_attribute_mask=0
683
684# These two masks determine what contact attributes are not retained.
685# There are two masks, because some contact attributes have host and
686# service options.  For example, you can disable host notifications for
687# a contact, but leave service notifications enabled for them.
688retained_contact_host_attribute_mask=0
689retained_contact_service_attribute_mask=0
690
691
692
693# INTERVAL LENGTH
694# This is the seconds per unit interval as used in the
695# host/contact/service configuration files.  Setting this to 60 means
696# that each interval is one minute long (60 seconds).  Other settings
697# have not been tested much, so your mileage is likely to vary...
698
699interval_length=30
700
701
702
703# AGGRESSIVE HOST CHECKING OPTION
704# If you don't want to turn on aggressive host checking features, set
705# this value to 0 (the default).  Otherwise set this value to 1 to
706# enable the aggressive check option.  Read the docs for more info
707# on what aggressive host check is or check out the source code in
708# base/checks.c
709
710use_aggressive_host_checking=0
711
712
713
714# SERVICE CHECK EXECUTION OPTION
715# This determines whether or not Nagios will actively execute
716# service checks when it initially starts.  If this option is
717# disabled, checks are not actively made, but Nagios can still
718# receive and process passive check results that come in.  Unless
719# you're implementing redundant hosts or have a special need for
720# disabling the execution of service checks, leave this enabled!
721# Values: 1 = enable checks, 0 = disable checks
722
723execute_service_checks=1
724
725
726
727# PASSIVE SERVICE CHECK ACCEPTANCE OPTION
728# This determines whether or not Nagios will accept passive
729# service checks results when it initially (re)starts.
730# Values: 1 = accept passive checks, 0 = reject passive checks
731
732accept_passive_service_checks=1
733
734
735
736# HOST CHECK EXECUTION OPTION
737# This determines whether or not Nagios will actively execute
738# host checks when it initially starts.  If this option is
739# disabled, checks are not actively made, but Nagios can still
740# receive and process passive check results that come in.  Unless
741# you're implementing redundant hosts or have a special need for
742# disabling the execution of host checks, leave this enabled!
743# Values: 1 = enable checks, 0 = disable checks
744
745execute_host_checks=1
746
747
748
749# PASSIVE HOST CHECK ACCEPTANCE OPTION
750# This determines whether or not Nagios will accept passive
751# host checks results when it initially (re)starts.
752# Values: 1 = accept passive checks, 0 = reject passive checks
753
754accept_passive_host_checks=1
755
756
757
758# NOTIFICATIONS OPTION
759# This determines whether or not Nagios will sent out any host or
760# service notifications when it is initially (re)started.
761# Values: 1 = enable notifications, 0 = disable notifications
762
763enable_notifications=1
764
765
766
767# EVENT HANDLER USE OPTION
768# This determines whether or not Nagios will run any host or
769# service event handlers when it is initially (re)started.  Unless
770# you're implementing redundant hosts, leave this option enabled.
771# Values: 1 = enable event handlers, 0 = disable event handlers
772
773enable_event_handlers=1
774
775
776
777# PROCESS PERFORMANCE DATA OPTION
778# This determines whether or not Nagios will process performance
779# data returned from service and host checks.  If this option is
780# enabled, host performance data will be processed using the
781# host_perfdata_command (defined below) and service performance
782# data will be processed using the service_perfdata_command (also
783# defined below).  Read the HTML docs for more information on
784# performance data.
785# Values: 1 = process performance data, 0 = do not process performance data
786
787process_performance_data=0
788
789
790
791# HOST AND SERVICE PERFORMANCE DATA PROCESSING COMMANDS
792# These commands are run after every host and service check is
793# performed.  These commands are executed only if the
794# enable_performance_data option (above) is set to 1.  The command
795# argument is the short name of a command definition that you
796# define in your host configuration file.  Read the HTML docs for
797# more information on performance data.
798
799#host_perfdata_command=process-host-perfdata
800#service_perfdata_command=process-service-perfdata
801
802
803
804# HOST AND SERVICE PERFORMANCE DATA FILES
805# These files are used to store host and service performance data.
806# Performance data is only written to these files if the
807# enable_performance_data option (above) is set to 1.
808
809#host_perfdata_file=/tmp/host-perfdata
810#service_perfdata_file=/tmp/service-perfdata
811
812
813
814# HOST AND SERVICE PERFORMANCE DATA FILE TEMPLATES
815# These options determine what data is written (and how) to the
816# performance data files.  The templates may contain macros, special
817# characters (\t for tab, \r for carriage return, \n for newline)
818# and plain text.  A newline is automatically added after each write
819# to the performance data file.  Some examples of what you can do are
820# shown below.
821
822#host_perfdata_file_template=[HOSTPERFDATA]\t$TIMET$\t$HOSTNAME$\t$HOSTEXECUTIONTIME$\t$HOSTOUTPUT$\t$HOSTPERFDATA$
823#service_perfdata_file_template=[SERVICEPERFDATA]\t$TIMET$\t$HOSTNAME$\t$SERVICEDESC$\t$SERVICEEXECUTIONTIME$\t$SERVICELATENCY$\t$SERVICEOUTPUT$\t$SERVICEPERFDATA$
824
825
826
827# HOST AND SERVICE PERFORMANCE DATA FILE MODES
828# This option determines whether or not the host and service
829# performance data files are opened in write ("w") or append ("a")
830# mode. If you want to use named pipes, you should use the special
831# pipe ("p") mode which avoid blocking at startup, otherwise you will
832# likely want the defult append ("a") mode.
833
834#host_perfdata_file_mode=a
835#service_perfdata_file_mode=a
836
837
838
839# HOST AND SERVICE PERFORMANCE DATA FILE PROCESSING INTERVAL
840# These options determine how often (in seconds) the host and service
841# performance data files are processed using the commands defined
842# below.  A value of 0 indicates the files should not be periodically
843# processed.
844
845#host_perfdata_file_processing_interval=0
846#service_perfdata_file_processing_interval=0
847
848
849
850# HOST AND SERVICE PERFORMANCE DATA FILE PROCESSING COMMANDS
851# These commands are used to periodically process the host and
852# service performance data files.  The interval at which the
853# processing occurs is determined by the options above.
854
855#host_perfdata_file_processing_command=process-host-perfdata-file
856#service_perfdata_file_processing_command=process-service-perfdata-file
857
858
859
860# OBSESS OVER SERVICE CHECKS OPTION
861# This determines whether or not Nagios will obsess over service
862# checks and run the ocsp_command defined below.  Unless you're
863# planning on implementing distributed monitoring, do not enable
864# this option.  Read the HTML docs for more information on
865# implementing distributed monitoring.
866# Values: 1 = obsess over services, 0 = do not obsess (default)
867
868obsess_over_services=0
869
870
871
872# OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE SERVICE PROCESSOR COMMAND
873# This is the command that is run for every service check that is
874# processed by Nagios.  This command is executed only if the
875# obsess_over_services option (above) is set to 1.  The command
876# argument is the short name of a command definition that you
877# define in your host configuration file. Read the HTML docs for
878# more information on implementing distributed monitoring.
879
880#ocsp_command=somecommand
881
882
883
884# OBSESS OVER HOST CHECKS OPTION
885# This determines whether or not Nagios will obsess over host
886# checks and run the ochp_command defined below.  Unless you're
887# planning on implementing distributed monitoring, do not enable
888# this option.  Read the HTML docs for more information on
889# implementing distributed monitoring.
890# Values: 1 = obsess over hosts, 0 = do not obsess (default)
891
892obsess_over_hosts=0
893
894
895
896# OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE HOST PROCESSOR COMMAND
897# This is the command that is run for every host check that is
898# processed by Nagios.  This command is executed only if the
899# obsess_over_hosts option (above) is set to 1.  The command
900# argument is the short name of a command definition that you
901# define in your host configuration file. Read the HTML docs for
902# more information on implementing distributed monitoring.
903
904#ochp_command=somecommand
905
906
907
908# TRANSLATE PASSIVE HOST CHECKS OPTION
909# This determines whether or not Nagios will translate
910# DOWN/UNREACHABLE passive host check results into their proper
911# state for this instance of Nagios.  This option is useful
912# if you have distributed or failover monitoring setup.  In
913# these cases your other Nagios servers probably have a different
914# "view" of the network, with regards to the parent/child relationship
915# of hosts.  If a distributed monitoring server thinks a host
916# is DOWN, it may actually be UNREACHABLE from the point of
917# this Nagios instance.  Enabling this option will tell Nagios
918# to translate any DOWN or UNREACHABLE host states it receives
919# passively into the correct state from the view of this server.
920# Values: 1 = perform translation, 0 = do not translate (default)
921
922translate_passive_host_checks=0
923
924
925
926# PASSIVE HOST CHECKS ARE SOFT OPTION
927# This determines whether or not Nagios will treat passive host
928# checks as being HARD or SOFT.  By default, a passive host check
929# result will put a host into a HARD state type.  This can be changed
930# by enabling this option.
931# Values: 0 = passive checks are HARD, 1 = passive checks are SOFT
932
933passive_host_checks_are_soft=0
934
935
936
937# ORPHANED HOST/SERVICE CHECK OPTIONS
938# These options determine whether or not Nagios will periodically
939# check for orphaned host service checks.  Since service checks are
940# not rescheduled until the results of their previous execution
941# instance are processed, there exists a possibility that some
942# checks may never get rescheduled.  A similar situation exists for
943# host checks, although the exact scheduling details differ a bit
944# from service checks.  Orphaned checks seem to be a rare
945# problem and should not happen under normal circumstances.
946# If you have problems with service checks never getting
947# rescheduled, make sure you have orphaned service checks enabled.
948# Values: 1 = enable checks, 0 = disable checks
949
950check_for_orphaned_services=1
951check_for_orphaned_hosts=1
952
953
954
955# SERVICE FRESHNESS CHECK OPTION
956# This option determines whether or not Nagios will periodically
957# check the "freshness" of service results.  Enabling this option
958# is useful for ensuring passive checks are received in a timely
959# manner.
960# Values: 1 = enabled freshness checking, 0 = disable freshness checking
961
962check_service_freshness=1
963
964
965
966# SERVICE FRESHNESS CHECK INTERVAL
967# This setting determines how often (in seconds) Nagios will
968# check the "freshness" of service check results.  If you have
969# disabled service freshness checking, this option has no effect.
970
971service_freshness_check_interval=60
972
973
974
975# HOST FRESHNESS CHECK OPTION
976# This option determines whether or not Nagios will periodically
977# check the "freshness" of host results.  Enabling this option
978# is useful for ensuring passive checks are received in a timely
979# manner.
980# Values: 1 = enabled freshness checking, 0 = disable freshness checking
981
982check_host_freshness=0
983
984
985
986# HOST FRESHNESS CHECK INTERVAL
987# This setting determines how often (in seconds) Nagios will
988# check the "freshness" of host check results.  If you have
989# disabled host freshness checking, this option has no effect.
990
991host_freshness_check_interval=60
992
993
994
995
996# ADDITIONAL FRESHNESS THRESHOLD LATENCY
997# This setting determines the number of seconds that Nagios
998# will add to any host and service freshness thresholds that
999# it calculates (those not explicitly specified by the user).
1000
1001additional_freshness_latency=15
1002
1003
1004
1005
1006# FLAP DETECTION OPTION
1007# This option determines whether or not Nagios will try
1008# and detect hosts and services that are "flapping". 
1009# Flapping occurs when a host or service changes between
1010# states too frequently.  When Nagios detects that a
1011# host or service is flapping, it will temporarily suppress
1012# notifications for that host/service until it stops
1013# flapping.  Flap detection is very experimental, so read
1014# the HTML documentation before enabling this feature!
1015# Values: 1 = enable flap detection
1016#         0 = disable flap detection (default)
1017
1018enable_flap_detection=1
1019
1020
1021
1022# FLAP DETECTION THRESHOLDS FOR HOSTS AND SERVICES
1023# Read the HTML documentation on flap detection for
1024# an explanation of what this option does.  This option
1025# has no effect if flap detection is disabled.
1026
1027low_service_flap_threshold=5.0
1028high_service_flap_threshold=20.0
1029low_host_flap_threshold=5.0
1030high_host_flap_threshold=20.0
1031
1032
1033
1034# DATE FORMAT OPTION
1035# This option determines how short dates are displayed. Valid options
1036# include:
1037#       us              (MM-DD-YYYY HH:MM:SS)
1038#       euro            (DD-MM-YYYY HH:MM:SS)
1039#       iso8601         (YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS)
1040#       strict-iso8601  (YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SS)
1041#
1042
1043date_format=iso8601
1044
1045
1046
1047
1048# TIMEZONE OFFSET
1049# This option is used to override the default timezone that this
1050# instance of Nagios runs in.  If not specified, Nagios will use
1051# the system configured timezone.
1052#
1053# NOTE: In order to display the correct timezone in the CGIs, you
1054# will also need to alter the Apache directives for the CGI path
1055# to include your timezone.  Example:
1056#
1057#   <Directory "/usr/local/nagios/sbin/">
1058#      SetEnv TZ "Australia/Brisbane"
1059#      ...
1060#   </Directory>
1061
1062#use_timezone=US/Mountain
1063#use_timezone=Australia/Brisbane
1064
1065
1066
1067
1068# P1.PL FILE LOCATION
1069# This value determines where the p1.pl perl script (used by the
1070# embedded Perl interpreter) is located.  If you didn't compile
1071# Nagios with embedded Perl support, this option has no effect.
1072
1073p1_file=/usr/lib/nagios3/p1.pl
1074
1075
1076
1077# EMBEDDED PERL INTERPRETER OPTION
1078# This option determines whether or not the embedded Perl interpreter
1079# will be enabled during runtime.  This option has no effect if Nagios
1080# has not been compiled with support for embedded Perl.
1081# Values: 0 = disable interpreter, 1 = enable interpreter
1082
1083enable_embedded_perl=1
1084
1085
1086
1087# EMBEDDED PERL USAGE OPTION
1088# This option determines whether or not Nagios will process Perl plugins
1089# and scripts with the embedded Perl interpreter if the plugins/scripts
1090# do not explicitly indicate whether or not it is okay to do so. Read
1091# the HTML documentation on the embedded Perl interpreter for more
1092# information on how this option works.
1093
1094use_embedded_perl_implicitly=1
1095
1096
1097
1098# ILLEGAL OBJECT NAME CHARACTERS
1099# This option allows you to specify illegal characters that cannot
1100# be used in host names, service descriptions, or names of other
1101# object types.
1102
1103illegal_object_name_chars=`~!$%^&*|'"<>?,()=
1104
1105
1106
1107# ILLEGAL MACRO OUTPUT CHARACTERS
1108# This option allows you to specify illegal characters that are
1109# stripped from macros before being used in notifications, event
1110# handlers, etc.  This DOES NOT affect macros used in service or
1111# host check commands.
1112# The following macros are stripped of the characters you specify:
1113#       $HOSTOUTPUT$
1114#       $HOSTPERFDATA$
1115#       $HOSTACKAUTHOR$
1116#       $HOSTACKCOMMENT$
1117#       $SERVICEOUTPUT$
1118#       $SERVICEPERFDATA$
1119#       $SERVICEACKAUTHOR$
1120#       $SERVICEACKCOMMENT$
1121
1122illegal_macro_output_chars=`~$&|'"<>
1123
1124
1125
1126# REGULAR EXPRESSION MATCHING
1127# This option controls whether or not regular expression matching
1128# takes place in the object config files.  Regular expression
1129# matching is used to match host, hostgroup, service, and service
1130# group names/descriptions in some fields of various object types.
1131# Values: 1 = enable regexp matching, 0 = disable regexp matching
1132
1133use_regexp_matching=0
1134
1135
1136
1137# "TRUE" REGULAR EXPRESSION MATCHING
1138# This option controls whether or not "true" regular expression
1139# matching takes place in the object config files.  This option
1140# only has an effect if regular expression matching is enabled
1141# (see above).  If this option is DISABLED, regular expression
1142# matching only occurs if a string contains wildcard characters
1143# (* and ?).  If the option is ENABLED, regexp matching occurs
1144# all the time (which can be annoying).
1145# Values: 1 = enable true matching, 0 = disable true matching
1146
1147use_true_regexp_matching=0
1148
1149
1150
1151# ADMINISTRATOR EMAIL/PAGER ADDRESSES
1152# The email and pager address of a global administrator (likely you).
1153# Nagios never uses these values itself, but you can access them by
1154# using the $ADMINEMAIL$ and $ADMINPAGER$ macros in your notification
1155# commands.
1156
1157admin_email=sipb-nagios@mit.edu
1158admin_pager=sipb-nagios@mit.edu
1159
1160
1161
1162# DAEMON CORE DUMP OPTION
1163# This option determines whether or not Nagios is allowed to create
1164# a core dump when it runs as a daemon.  Note that it is generally
1165# considered bad form to allow this, but it may be useful for
1166# debugging purposes.  Enabling this option doesn't guarantee that
1167# a core file will be produced, but that's just life...
1168# Values: 1 - Allow core dumps
1169#         0 - Do not allow core dumps (default)
1170
1171daemon_dumps_core=0
1172
1173
1174
1175# LARGE INSTALLATION TWEAKS OPTION
1176# This option determines whether or not Nagios will take some shortcuts
1177# which can save on memory and CPU usage in large Nagios installations.
1178# Read the documentation for more information on the benefits/tradeoffs
1179# of enabling this option.
1180# Values: 1 - Enabled tweaks
1181#         0 - Disable tweaks (default)
1182
1183use_large_installation_tweaks=0
1184
1185
1186
1187# ENABLE ENVIRONMENT MACROS
1188# This option determines whether or not Nagios will make all standard
1189# macros available as environment variables when host/service checks
1190# and system commands (event handlers, notifications, etc.) are
1191# executed.  Enabling this option can cause performance issues in
1192# large installations, as it will consume a bit more memory and (more
1193# importantly) consume more CPU.
1194# Values: 1 - Enable environment variable macros (default)
1195#         0 - Disable environment variable macros
1196
1197enable_environment_macros=1
1198
1199
1200
1201# CHILD PROCESS MEMORY OPTION
1202# This option determines whether or not Nagios will free memory in
1203# child processes (processed used to execute system commands and host/
1204# service checks).  If you specify a value here, it will override
1205# program defaults.
1206# Value: 1 - Free memory in child processes
1207#        0 - Do not free memory in child processes
1208
1209#free_child_process_memory=1
1210
1211
1212
1213# CHILD PROCESS FORKING BEHAVIOR
1214# This option determines how Nagios will fork child processes
1215# (used to execute system commands and host/service checks).  Normally
1216# child processes are fork()ed twice, which provides a very high level
1217# of isolation from problems.  Fork()ing once is probably enough and will
1218# save a great deal on CPU usage (in large installs), so you might
1219# want to consider using this.  If you specify a value here, it will
1220# program defaults.
1221# Value: 1 - Child processes fork() twice
1222#        0 - Child processes fork() just once
1223
1224#child_processes_fork_twice=1
1225
1226
1227
1228# DEBUG LEVEL
1229# This option determines how much (if any) debugging information will
1230# be written to the debug file.  OR values together to log multiple
1231# types of information.
1232# Values:
1233#          -1 = Everything
1234#          0 = Nothing
1235#          1 = Functions
1236#          2 = Configuration
1237#          4 = Process information
1238#          8 = Scheduled events
1239#          16 = Host/service checks
1240#          32 = Notifications
1241#          64 = Event broker
1242#          128 = External commands
1243#          256 = Commands
1244#          512 = Scheduled downtime
1245#          1024 = Comments
1246#          2048 = Macros
1247
1248debug_level=0
1249
1250
1251
1252# DEBUG VERBOSITY
1253# This option determines how verbose the debug log out will be.
1254# Values: 0 = Brief output
1255#         1 = More detailed
1256#         2 = Very detailed
1257
1258debug_verbosity=1
1259
1260
1261
1262# DEBUG FILE
1263# This option determines where Nagios should write debugging information.
1264
1265debug_file=/var/lib/nagios3/nagios.debug
1266
1267
1268
1269# MAX DEBUG FILE SIZE
1270# This option determines the maximum size (in bytes) of the debug file.  If
1271# the file grows larger than this size, it will be renamed with a .old
1272# extension.  If a file already exists with a .old extension it will
1273# automatically be deleted.  This helps ensure your disk space usage doesn't
1274# get out of control when debugging Nagios.
1275
1276max_debug_file_size=1000000
1277
1278
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