Heavily shielded room
Devoted to SQUID microscopy, we have a magnetically shielded, class 10,000 clean room built by IMEDCO (Switzerland). The room has two layers of mu-metal and a three-axis active coil cancellation system. A three-layer mu-metal cylindrical can inside the room houses the SQUID Microscope. The DC fields inside the room are < 20 nT, and the peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.01 Hz AC fields are < 0.1 nT. Inside the three-layer shielded can, the 0.01 Hz AC fields have peak-to-peak amplitudes of < 0.01 nT. The shielding factor and ambient field noise and DC fields inside the room are reported here.

Lightly shielded room
Our 2G superconducting rock magnetometer, associated demagnetization equipment, and meteorite clean lab are house in a second magnetically shielded room built by IMEDCO (Switzerland). This room has a single layer of mu-metal such that DC fields are < 150 nT, and the peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.01 Hz AC fields are < 40 nT. The shielded room is divided into a dirty space for magnetic measurements and a class 10,000 clean lab for preparation and analysis of meteorite and lunar samples. The shielding factor and ambient field noise and DC fields inside the room are reported here.

SQUID Microscope
This superconducting magnetometer maps the vertical component of the magnetic field above room temperature samples. With a moment sensitivity of 10-16 Am2 and a spatial resolution of better than 0.10 mm, it is the most sensitive and highest resolution SQUID magnetometer in use in the geosciences. The SQUID Microscope's sensitivity and high resolution imaging-capability allow us to measure the magnetism of tiny grains, to map magnetization in rock thin sections, and to monitor changes in magnetization on a grain by grain basis during both demagnetization and rock magnetic experiments. Currently, the MIT SQUID Microscope is equipped with a monolithic SQUID sensor that senses the vertical component of the magnetic field above the sample. Check out this SQUID Microscope scan of George on the 1 dollar bill.

Superconducting Rock Magnetometer 755, 2G Enterprises
The lab workhorse, this standard moment magnetometer has a sensitivity of 10-9 Am2. Although this is nearly 10,000 times less than the SQUID Microscope, the 2G uniquely measures the three-components of the next moment, and it is outfitted with an Automatic Sample Changer (see below) for high-throughout measurements of large numbers of paleomagnetic cores.

Automatic Sample Changer
Designed by Joe Kirschvink (Caltech) to prevent graduate students from going brain-dead, this amazing system automatically measures, alternating field demagnetizes, and conducts rock magnetic experiments on 200 standard 1-in diameter paleomagnetic core samples at a time. This frees the user from having to manually make the repetitive, seemingly endless demagnetization measurements necessary for a typical paleomagnetic study.
/ movie clip link /

Automated Rock Magnetic Equipment
Associated with our automated sample changer, we have an alternating field degausser (maximum field of 0.3 T), isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition (maximum field over 3 T), anhysteretic remanent magnetization acquisition, rotational remanent magnetization acquisition, susceptibility, and back field isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition equipment.

Thermal Demagnetizer with Controlled Atmosphere and Paleointensity Coil, ASC Scientific
Our thermal demagnetizer reaches temperatures of 800 C and peak DC fields inside are < 10 nT. A an axial coil is integrated with the system for paleointensity experiments, and we have a controlled atmosphere chamber for mitigating against chemical alteration during heating.

Portable Fluxgate Magnetometer, MEDA, Inc.
With a sensitivity of 1 nT and direct readout, this three-axis hand-held is the handiest instrument in the lab.
/ link /

Gaussmeter, Magnetic Instrumentation
For measuring big fields (several G up to many kG).
/ link /

Vibrating Sample Magnetometer
(in Prof. Caroline Ross' lab in the MIT Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)
/ link /

Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometer
(in Prof. Caroline Ross' lab in the MIT Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)
/ link /

Magnetic Property Measurement Systems
(in MIT Center for Materials Science and Engineering)
/ link /

Bruker EMX Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectrometer
(in the MIT Department of Chemistry Instrumentation Facility)
/ link /

// Heavily shielded room

// Lightly shielded room

// SQUID Microscope

// Superconducting Rock Magnetometer 755, 2G Enterprises

// Automated Rock Magnetic Equipment

// Thermal Demagnetizer with Controlled Atmosphere and Paleointensity Coil